December

A woman sweeps dust from the entrance to her tent in a camp for displaced people in Yemen.
A woman sweeps dust from the entrance to her tent in a camp for displaced people in Yemen.

DISASTER

7.4 million people at risk of famine in Yemen as the world’s worst humanitarian crisis continues.

IMPACT

An estimated 24 million people – almost 80 per cent of the population – need humanitarian assistance and protection.

RESPONSE

In partnership with the World Food Programme (WFP) we provide food to sustain around 2.2 million people every month in six governorates. We run malnutrition treatment and prevention programmes in 155 health facilities. We support eight health centres to manage acute watery diarrhoea and cholera, and fund three physiotherapy and prosthetic centres for patients with life-changing injuries.

“If there is enough food we eat, and if not we have to be patient. The most important thing is that children get their milk. For us adults it’s not a problem if we have to stay hungry. We just eat anything to keep us alive.”

Shoeyah’s son Adnan has been malnourished since birth. The family cannot return to their home in Yemen’s Haradh region due to the intense fighting so they live in a shack in Hodeida, waiting and hoping. “I hope that my children will have good health in the future and pray to God to stop the war,” she says.
December 2019 marks the first anniversary of the UN-brokered ceasefire in Yemen but violence continues. Islamic Relief staff work 18 hours a day, seven days a week, often at great personal risk. Tragically, earlier this year a stray bullet killed one of our dedicated colleagues, Hamdi Abo Abdullah Al-ahmadi, as he delivered aid.

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